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Brynhyfryd infants and juniors merger proposal to go before Swansea Council cabinet

By South Wales Evening Post  |  Posted: May 01, 2014

By Alex Brown

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PROPOSALS that will see two Swansea schools join forces could move a step closer next week.

Children are set to benefit from a plan that will see the infant and junior schools in Brynhyfryd united under a single banner to create an all-through primary school for three to 11-year-olds.

The proposal will go before Swansea Council's cabinet next week.

Will Evans, the council's cabinet member for lifelong learning, said: "Our proposal is good news for future generations of youngsters in Brynhyfryd because, for the first time, they won't have to change schools at the age of seven.

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"If agreed, it will mean children will have a seamless education from the time they join to the time they leave while parents will have to deal with one head teacher and one governing body instead of two, as it is at the moment."

Amalgamation would also mean greater flexibility for staff to cover all subjects, more opportunities to share facilities and greater opportunities for staff development.

No decisions have been made as the cabinet next week is being asked to give permission to allow a consultation to go ahead in the community first.

If approved, the two schools would close at the end of the summer term in 2015 and reopen as a single school the following September.

All the youngsters will continue to be educated on the two existing sites.

Mr Evans said: "Swansea has been following a successful programme of amalgamation of infant and junior schools into all-through primaries over the last few years.

"When a child transfers from one school to another — such as from primary school to secondary school — it always takes a bit of time to adjust and settle in.

"By creating an all-through primary for Brynhyfryd it'll remove the need for a change-over and that will help pupils, staff and parents continue to focus on learning and lessons."

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