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Bus passengers witness pack of hounds kill fox in busy Carmarthen road

By LeeMacGregor  |  Posted: February 19, 2013

A pack of hounds bear down on a fox on the A40 near Abergwili Carmarthen

A pack of hounds bear down on a fox on the A40 near Abergwili Carmarthen

Comments (35)

BUS passengers watched on in horror as a pack of hounds caught a fox and began “tearing it to pieces” in the middle of a main road in Carmarthen.

Dyfed-Powys Police has confirmed it is investigating the incident, which took place on the A40 near Abergwili shortly after 10.30am on Saturday.

Witnesses said the chase came down from the wooded area above and onto the busy road between Abergwili and Whitemill.

It is believed that the incident resulted in one of the dogs colliding with a car.

The incident was witnessed by bus passengers, one of whom took this picture. It is unclear which hunt the dogs belonged to.

A spokesman for the Carmarthenshire Hunt confirmed that it was 20 miles away from the incident — in the Pendine area — on Saturday, and had confirmed this to police.

The picture was posted on the Spotted Carmarthen Facebook page, along with the comment: “This morning on the A40 just coming out of Abergwili a group of hunting dogs came running down from the forest on the hill onto the busy road with a fox and started tearing it to pieces.”

The comment added that one of the dogs was involved in a collision with a car, adding “it was one the most horrible things to experience”.

The post sparked a flurry of activity on social media sites, attracting more than 1,600 comments both in favour and against hunting with hounds.

Countryside Alliance regional director Rachel Evans said there were “many registered and unregistered packs” of hunting dogs operating across the area.

She did not wish to comment further as she was not fully aware of the incident. A Dyfed-Powys Police spokesman said: “Dyfed-Powys are investigating an incident which happened on the A40 between Abergwili and Whitemill shortly after 10.30am Saturday.

“The incident involved a pack of hunting dogs and a fox. As part of the investigation officers have been speaking with witnesses and members of the hunt to establish what happened.

“These inquiries are ongoing and it would be inappropriate to comment further at this point.”

An RSPCA spokesman said the charity was not investigating the incident.

The Hunting Act 2004, which bans the hunting of wild mammals with dogs in England and Wales, came into force on February 18, 2005.

Did you witness the incident? Contact Lee MacGregor on 01267 227233 or email lee.macgregor@swwmedia.co.uk

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35 comments

  • Hareymary  |  February 21 2013, 5:31PM

    @callandh - I know! But it didn't seem to have posted the first time.

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  • callandh  |  February 21 2013, 3:58PM

    Harey Mary seems trigger happy :)

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  • Hareymary  |  February 21 2013, 9:12AM

    THE ARROGANCE OF MAN I took your space And vandalised your small world To make as part of mine; Taming its wildness, Changing the nature of things. I fenced that stolen land for business, So nature would not intrude; Expecting its respect For my man-made boundaries That I patrolled with trap and gun And poison. But I blame you still For your presence Among the grazing livelihood Of the one who took your hunting ground, Your playing fields, The one who shattered your quiet life, With arrogance and disrespect; Without a second thought. Andrew Calloway

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  • Hareymary  |  February 21 2013, 9:11AM

    THE ARROGANCE OF MAN I took your space And vandalised your small world To make as part of mine; Taming its wildness, Changing the nature of things. I fenced that stolen land for business, So nature would not intrude; Expecting its respect For my man-made boundaries That I patrolled with trap and gun And poison. But I blame you still For your presence Among the grazing livelihood Of the one who took your hunting ground, Your playing fields, The one who shattered your quiet life, With arrogance and disrespect; Without a second thought. Andrew Calloway

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  • the_country  |  February 21 2013, 7:41AM

    rowena you said "We can't even be bothered to kill anything humanely" That is in fact one of the reasons I support fox hunting. When I used to go out hunting I knew that a fox would ether die or would be caught there was no chance or it being wounded as there is with guns then suffering until it died or was got by hounds. The death of a fox out hunting is also very quick, a second or in the worst cases two at most. Hounds will instinctively try and kill a fox by biting it behind the head and shacking the body thereby breaking its head, at this point it is dead and the fact the hounds used to break up the dead carcass did not affect the fox one bit. "When hunting was legal there were dreadful tales of huntspeople creating artificial dens for foxes to hunt or keeping captured foxes in metal bins for days on end without food or water before letting them out to be hunted." You are right to suggest that foxes were given artificial earths in some places but this was not as some miss informed people believe to 'breed foxes' but instead to encourage foxes into areas they would do less damage and to try and prevent foxes from living out (when they live in hedges rather than in woods) because it is these foes that often do most damage to farmers livestock. As for keeping foxes in bins without food that is a cruel and barbaric practice and one I have never heard of happening – I guarantee I am as much opposed to whoever used to do that as you are!

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  • rowena  |  February 21 2013, 12:30AM

    We can't even be bothered to kill anything humanely, whether it's foxes or rats, we just poison, shoot, maim etc etc etc. You'd think by now we could make a poison that didn't cause an animal to suffer wouldn't you? When hunting was legal there were dreadful tales of huntspeople creating artificial dens for foxes to hunt or keeping captured foxes in metal bins for days on end without food or water before letting them out to be hunted. Perhaps they still do all that, who knows? Humans like killing and inflicting pain, which has helped us in becoming the biggest infestation on the planet.

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  • the_country  |  February 20 2013, 5:27PM

    fischadler you said "Foxes don't need to be controlled. They control themselves depending on how much food is available. The more food the more cubs they have. The more you try to 'control' them then other foxes will move in to the vacant territory. Look at the science. YOU CANT CONTROL FOXES." Let me try and break this up into separate points – "Foxes don't need to be controlled. They control themselves depending on how much food is available." I an afraid foxes do need to be controlled because although in theory this is true in practice foxes go out and eat lambs, chickens and game if there is not enough food for them in the wild. This is why hunts spread out the fox population to try and prevent this. "The more you try to 'control' them then other foxes will move in to the vacant territory." Although it is true that other foxes will move into a vacant territory that statement is a bit like saying 'there is no need to wash because you will just get dirty again' or 'there is no need to fix that window it will just get broken again'. "Look at the science. YOU CANT CONTROL FOXES" Humans have been effectively controlling foxes for hundreds of years, this statement is just blatantly untrue!

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  • the_country  |  February 20 2013, 2:18PM

    Please read this fully and then make up you decisions about both me and my sport. Foxes only cause problems for people when they are concentrated in a small area. Fox hunting is the only proven method of dispersing cubs so as to keep concentrations low. Once the foxes have been dispersed, hunting succeeds in removing the old and weak foxes therefore leaving a healthy and sustainable population. Our countryside is totally man made and maintained. From the grass parks of Lincolnshire to the rolling moors of the Scottish Borders the landscape has been modelled by man. Now we must control what we have made. An estimated 48% of foxes shot by rifles are wounded and not killed; this is heightened to a staggering 60% with shotguns. Hunting will never leave wounded, you either account for your fox or not. A fox that got away will only have heavy breathing for half an hour; it will then go back to its normal habits. Death in the wild, in the absence of natural predators and without hunting, involves pain, sepsis, gangrene, starvation, hypothermia for days or even weeks before death supervenes. This is a slow and painful death. Hunting dispatches these foxes quickly and efficiently before the suffering has started. Hunting always provides a clean kill because the hounds instinctively bite the fox around the back of the neck and shake the fox, severing the spinal cord and killing the fox instantaneously. Hunting is not a form of pest control but one of wildlife management; hunts do not want or expect to wipe out the fox from the areas in which they operate. Hunting tries to maintain a fit healthy population of foxes that can live in harmony with humans. Hunting is the only selective form of controlling foxes. In autumn when hunts start hunting they 'holt up' the woods where fox cubs have been born, the dog, male cubs (by this stage almost fully grown and fully capable of fending for themselves) and vixen will leave first then the strongest female cub followed by her younger siblings. For this reason a huntsman (the person who controls the hounds) can selectively kill the weaker female cubs, this will leave a healthy population of foxes while controlling the number that are capable of reproducing – this is a very good way of effectively controlling the number of breeding foxes in an area. A carefully compiled document published in 2007 by the Veterinary Association of Wildlife Management in collaboration with the All Parliamentary Middle Way Group comprehensively puts the scientific record straight in respect of the hunting debate and demonstrates that there are not and never were any scientific grounds for banning hunting on the grounds of cruelty. I do not hate foxes, I think they are incredible animals and deserve our upmost admiration and respect but they are still pests and is why I strongly believe hunting with hounds is the best and most proven way of controlling the fox population.

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  • John_on_Gower  |  February 19 2013, 3:58PM

    'The Countryside Allience' have done a very good job of miss-information about foxes and have convinced a lot of people that we need hunting with dogs.

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  • fischadler  |  February 19 2013, 2:50PM

    Foxes dont need to be controlled. They control themselves depending on how much food is available. The more food the more cubs they have. The more you try to 'control' them then other foxes will move in to the vacant territory. Look at the science. YOU CANT CONTROL FOXES.

    Rate   7
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